The History of Intricate Roselilies

If you haven't yet experienced the elegant and unique Roselily, you're in for quite the treat.  These extraordinary flowers are a special series of multi-layered lilies.  Just take a look at the soft, unfurled petals in the photo below.

 Roselily Belonica

Roselily Belonica

As you can see, when Roselilies are fully open, they resemble the stratified characteristics of a rose, while still boasting the exceptionally positive attributes of a lily (hence the name).  

What are these "exceptionally positive attributes?"  First, for all their complicated beauty, Roselilies do not have a heavy or overpowering scent.  Rather, they offer up a light fragrance which doesn't trigger sensitive noses.  Second, they produce no pollen, which is great news for allergy-sufferers and neat-freaks alike. And third, just look at them! They are incredible, singular, and breathtaking.

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Roselilies are still a relatively new breed; discovered, developed, and perfected by De Looff Lily Innovation in the early 2000s.  However, commercial production of these exceptional flowers didn't actually start until a decade later (around 2011) with the favorite, Roselily Belonica.

The strongest attribute of a Roselily is its large, lushly layered bloom.  They grow best in warm, controlled greenhouse environments, which puts every bit of stored energy in the lily bulb to work.  In this way, the bulb builds its kingdom of one to two, 6+ inch blooms atop a strong, sturdy stem, seemingly multiple flowers in one.

 Roselily Belonica in the Greenhouse

Roselily Belonica in the Greenhouse

The team of De Looff hasn't stopped developing new varieties, such as the striking pink Elena, the softer-hued Natalia, and the pure white variety, My Wedding (see photos below).  These beautiful and lush lilies are growing in popularity, and I'm sure that new varieties and hues will continue to come to market as demand increases.

 Roselilies L-R: Elena and My Wedding

Roselilies L-R: Elena and My Wedding